Tag Archives for " ppc "

Expanded Text Ads – What You Need To Know

The new text ad format has been around for a while now, but it’s surprising how many advertisers aren’t using them yet.

If you’re not familiar with them here’s a quick overview of how they compare:

Standard Text Ads Expanded Text Ads
Headline (25 characters)

Display URL (35 characters)

Description Line 1 (35 characters)

Description Line 2 (35 characters)

Final URL

 

Headline 1 (30 characters)

Headline 2 (30 characters)

Path 1 (15 characters)

Path 2 (15 characters)

Description (80 characters)

Final URL

Total characters available: 130 Total characters available: 170

This great image from the Wordsream blog illustrates the differences between the standard and expanded text ads in the search results:

As you can see you get a noticeably bigger ad than before!

3 Great Reasons To Use Expanded Text Ads

#1  Get Ahead Of Your Competition

If they’re not using them you can get a step ahead and show bigger, better ads that are more likely to get clicked.  If they ARE using them then they’re taking up more ad real estate than you and those searchers are more likely to click on their ads instead of yours!

#2  Increased CTRs

Although not the case across the board, most advertisers are seeing higher click through rates with the expanded texts ads.  This will be even more noticeable if you’ve beaten your competitors to implementing them and your ETAs are up against standard text ads in the search results.

#3  Say More!

You have 40 more characters to get your message across with extended text ads – that’s 30{e06b1562e17c07ecc659e3cdbf138b61b3f5cbe825ef813d84966cd0661b5b38} more ad text available to persuade and convince prospects to click on your ad.

Don’t Ignore ETAs

From 26th October 2016 you’ll no longer be able to create new standard text ads or edit existing ones.  Ads already running in your account will continue to do so, but any new ads will automatically be created as extended text ads.

Best Practices

Write one ETA that’s similar to your existing ad, to use as a control ad.

Put your most important messaging in the headlines

These are shown in larger font and highlighted in blue so make sure your most important ad copy goes here.

Remember that sometimes the headlines can be spit over two lines and you have no way of knowing where the line will break.  Google can even truncate your second headline so make sure not to have anything vital at the end of that line!

Don’t pause your old ads straight away

It’s not always the case that the extended ads have higher click through rates than the old ones, so keep your existing ones until you know the new ones are performing ok.  That way you can tweak and test until your happy with performance and then pause the old ones.

Write ads for all devices

You can’t create mobile preferred ads with expanded text ads so make sure your ads will work for desktop, mobile and tablets.

Put keywords in the path fields

You can add 2 15 char path fields to how in your display URL – this is a great way of reassuring searchers they’re going to a relevant site and that the ad relates to what they searched for.  It will also improve your quality score by making the ads more relevant and increasing CTRs.

Check your ad extensions

If you’ve added more information to your new ad make sure you’re not duplicating what’s already in your ad extensions.   Make sure you still have unique content in your extensions that will complement the text in your new ads.

Welcome To The All New Merchant Centre

OK, so it’s not ‘all new’, but rather it’s had a face lift and some new functionality.  This all happened last week.

If you’re running Google Shopping ads you’ll be familiar with Google Merchant Centre from when you got things set up and imported your first feeds.  Many retailers don’t need to visit Merchant Centre again once things are up and running, unless there’s a problem.  So the new look and feel won’t have been noticed by most people.

All New Navigation

(Image courtesy of Google.com)

The first thing you’ll notice is the new layout, navigation and colour scheme.  According to Google this is now “..aligned with the modern look and feel of the rest of Google’s products”.  Common tasks have now been grouped together in the navigation eg the new ‘products’ menu option contains data about product feeds and data quality.

Discover New Shopping Programs

One very cool feature is the ability to look at what new shopping programs are available to you and to enable them from within Merchant Centre.

If you click on the 3 vertical dots in the top right of the dashboard and select ‘Merchant Center programs’ you’ll see the screen below.

It’s important to note that the options shown here will vary depending on what programs you’re already using.

Feature Updates

Not only has the look and feel changed, they’ve made changes to the most frequently used features to make them quicker and easier to use.

There are improvements to feed rules, diagnostics and currency conversion – for a full explanation of the changes and updates read the Google blog here: http://adwords.googleblog.com/2016/08/introducing-new-google-merchant-center.html

All in all it seems like a change for the better with improved functionality, easier navigation and faster load times.  If you’re using Merchant Centre I’d love to know what you think of the changes.

Tablet Bid Adjustments Are Here!

People access your website in so many ways: on their desktop PC, smartphone or tablet.  Even with a mobile friendly website, however, you can get wildly differing results for your ads on these various devices.

For most people mobile and tablets don’t do as well, usually giving higher Cost Per Acquisition (CPA) figures.  Until now, the only way you could combat this was to use bid adjustments for mobile devices.  What this does in a nutshell is to lower your bids to anyone viewing your ad on a smartphone.  This usually results in lowering the CPA for mobile visitors.  Great!

But, what we usually find is that the worst performing device of all is tablets.  CPAs for tablets can often be double, triple or even more those of desktop CPAs!  This is probably down to a poor user experience on tablets even if your site is mobile friendly.  It’s not really a mobile and it’s not really a desktop…..

All that changed today however!  I’m very pleased to say that now you can also make bid adjustments for tablets and desktops.  My first job tomorrow will be to go and add them to a multitude of campaigns that I know perform dreadfully on tablets, and I suggest you do the same.

How do you check on the performance by device?

From the Campaigns tab click on ‘Segment’ and in the drop down box choose ‘Device’ (make sure you have the columns enabled to show your conversion data – Columns > Modify Columns).  You will then be shown the breakdown of performance by campaign and by device.  If you’ve never seen this before you might be in for a surprise!

When you spot a campaign that has either a very high or very low CPA on a particular device make a note – don’t forget you can add a bid adjustment up if a device is costing you less for conversions too.

To make the adjustments navigate to the campaign and click on the ‘Settings’ tab, then on the ‘Devices’ tab.  Each device will be listed along with the data for the campaign.  If you’ve never set bid adjustments before there’ll be a little dash under the ‘Bid adj’ column – simply click on that and enter your adjustment.  You can increase or decrease bids for each device: increase on devices that are giving low CPAs and decrease if they’re costing more than they should.

Don’t forget to check back regularly to keep track of how the campaign is performing and edit the bid adjustments as needed.

Not Sure If You Need To Adjust Bids?

If you’re not sure if you should adjust your bids for tablets (or any other device for that matter) then why not book a FREE account audit and I’ll not only tell you about this but any other issues you may have in your account, along with how to find areas for growth.

Book A FREE Account Audit Here!

How To Use Custom Labels In Google Shopping

If you’re running shopping campaigns and you’re not using custom labels you’re missing a big trick.

What Are Custom Labels?

When you upload your feed to Google you have the option of defining multiple ‘custom label’ attributes.  These are fields you can add to your feed to record any data you like relating to your products.  This is not required and many merchants just don’t bother with them.

Why Would You Use Custom Labels?

The main reason you’d use custom labels in your product feed is to give you additional ways to organise your products in your AdWords campaigns.  More importantly, you can organise products in any way you choose, depending on what you have in your custom label fields.

With a ‘normal’ product feed, you can organise products in your campaign by Brand, Category, Product Type etc – not very inventive and not always the most helpful way when it comes to bidding.

With custom labels you can define other attributes by which to sort your products.  For example, you could define ‘custom label 0’ as price ranges: <£50, £50-£199, £200-£499, £500-£1,000.  Now it stands to reason you’d want to bid more on a product that’s £650 than you would for one that’s selling at £16.50 right?  By categorising your products by price range you can group them in your campaign and adjust your bids accordingly.

Another similar option would be to divid products with different profit margins.  Assign a custom label accordingly and then your bidding can be adjusted depending on how much money you make for those products.

There’s no limit as to how you can use this.  Another very popular method is to add a custom label to sale items or products on special promotion.    You might even want to exclude such items from your campaigns if the margins are very low.

What Does It Look Like In AdWords?

You can see below that we’ve already got our products sub-divided by brand.  To break them down further you’ll click the ‘+’ symbol on the right as usual.

This opens the dialogue box shown below, which I’m sure you’re familiar with from when you sub-divided your products by brand or product type and such.  You can see here I’ve selected ‘Custom label 1’.  In this example the feed has been categorised using ‘price buckets’, from low  to high and various options in between.  You can now add these by selecting the right arrows and you’ll then be able to bid and optimise according to the price range of your products.

I’m sure you can see the potential for using custom labels: it gives you much more control and flexibility within your Shopping campaigns.

Here are some other examples of great ways to use custom labels:

  • Best Sellers
  • Sale Items
  • Margin
  • Brand
  • Seasonal
  • Gender
  • Special Shipping
  • Push Label
  • Colour, Size, Weight

The possibilities are really only limited by your imagination but think of how you can use these to make a real difference to your Google Shopping Campaigns and ultimately to your company’s bottom line.